PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

When should I see a health care provider about altitude or mountain sickness?

ANSWER

  • If mild symptoms persist after you go to a lower altitude, call a health care provider.
  • For severe symptoms, the person should see a doctor as soon as possible, even if symptoms go away after they get to a lower altitude.

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "High Altitude Illness: How to Avoid It and How to Treat It."

CDC: "Altitude Illness."

American Heart Association: "High Altitude Sickness."

American College of Emergency Physicians: "Getting High: AMS, HACE, and HAPE."

Schimelpfenig, T. , Stackpole Books, 1991. NOLS Wilderness First Aid

Weiss, E. , Adventure Medical Kits, 2005. A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness Travel

International Society of Mountain Medicine: "An Altitude Tutorial."

Altitude/Mountain Sickness Information from eMedicineHealth .

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on January 29, 2018

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "High Altitude Illness: How to Avoid It and How to Treat It."

CDC: "Altitude Illness."

American Heart Association: "High Altitude Sickness."

American College of Emergency Physicians: "Getting High: AMS, HACE, and HAPE."

Schimelpfenig, T. , Stackpole Books, 1991. NOLS Wilderness First Aid

Weiss, E. , Adventure Medical Kits, 2005. A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness Travel

International Society of Mountain Medicine: "An Altitude Tutorial."

Altitude/Mountain Sickness Information from eMedicineHealth .

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on January 29, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

When is a broken collarbone a medical emergency?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.