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When should you see a doctor about a tick bite?

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See a doctor immediately if the tick has burrowed into skin or if the head, mouthparts, or other tick remains cannot be removed.

Otherwise, see a doctor if:

  • You think it might be a deer tick, which is especially prevalent in the Northeast U.S. Your doctor may prescribe a single dose of an antibiotic to help prevent Lyme disease.
  • You develop flu-like symptoms including fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and muscle aches, or a rash within one month after the bite. Take the tick to the health care provider's office or the hospital if possible.
  • The bite area develops a lesion within 30 days. A sign of Lyme disease infection is a "bullseye" rash in which the center becomes clearer as the redness moves outward in a circular pattern.
  • There are signs of infection such as redness, warmth, or inflammation.

From: Tick Bite Treatment WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: “Tick Bites."

KidsHealth: "Tick Removal, A Step-by-Step Guide" and "Tick Bites."

CDC: "Lyme Disease Symptoms;" "Lyme Disease: Treatment and Prognosis;" and "Tick Removal."

Wormser, G. 2006. Clinical Infectious Diseases,

FamilyDoctor: "Lyme Disease."

UpToDate.

Ticks Information from eMedicineHealth .

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on January 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: “Tick Bites."

KidsHealth: "Tick Removal, A Step-by-Step Guide" and "Tick Bites."

CDC: "Lyme Disease Symptoms;" "Lyme Disease: Treatment and Prognosis;" and "Tick Removal."

Wormser, G. 2006. Clinical Infectious Diseases,

FamilyDoctor: "Lyme Disease."

UpToDate.

Ticks Information from eMedicineHealth .

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on January 15, 2018

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