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How can night splints help with plantar fasciitis?

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Most of us sleep with our feet pointed down, which shortens the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon. Night splints, which you wear while you sleep, keep your feet at a 90-degree angle. So instead of shortening your plantar fascia, you get a good, constant stretch while you sleep. They can be bulky, but they tend to work really well. And once the pain is gone, you can stop wearing them.

From: What Can I Do for My Plantar Fasciitis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Family Physician: "Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis."

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society.

Mayo Clinic.

Medscape: "Plantar Fasciitis Treatment & Management."

The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association: " The integration of acetic acid iontophoresis, orthotic therapy and physical rehabilitation for chronic plantar fasciitis: a case study."

UpToDate: “Plantar Fasciitis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Plantar Fasciitis and Bone Spurs.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on September 10, 2017

SOURCES:

American Family Physician: "Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis."

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society.

Mayo Clinic.

Medscape: "Plantar Fasciitis Treatment & Management."

The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association: " The integration of acetic acid iontophoresis, orthotic therapy and physical rehabilitation for chronic plantar fasciitis: a case study."

UpToDate: “Plantar Fasciitis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Plantar Fasciitis and Bone Spurs.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on September 10, 2017

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How can a walking cast or boot help with plantar fasciitis?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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