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What are ankle injuries?

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Ankle injuries are defined by the kind of tissue -- bone, ligament, or tendon -- that's damaged. The ankle is where three bones meet -- the tibia and fibula of your lower leg with the talus of your foot. These bones are held together at the ankle joint by ligaments, which are strong elastic bands of connective tissue that keep the bones in place while allowing normal ankle motion. Tendons attach muscles to the bones to do the work of making the ankle and foot move, and help keep the joints stable.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures."

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine: "Ankle Sprains: How to Speed Your Recovery."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Ankle Sprains: Healing and Preventing Injury."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Sprained Ankle."

American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons: "Peroneal Tendon Injuries."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Sprains and Strains.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on September 18, 2016

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Ankle Fractures."

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine: "Ankle Sprains: How to Speed Your Recovery."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Ankle Sprains: Healing and Preventing Injury."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Sprained Ankle."

American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons: "Peroneal Tendon Injuries."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Sprains and Strains.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on September 18, 2016

NEXT QUESTION:

What is an ankle fracture versus an ankle sprain?

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