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What are some safety guidelines when doing calf-strengthening exercises?

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Follow these guidelines so your calf-strengthening exercises are safe and effective:

  • Do the exercises consistently two or three times a week to build strength.
  • Move slowly through each exercise so you stay aware of your body alignment. Press up for a slow count of two to four. Then lower back down for a slow count of four.
  • Customize your exercise to match your level of fitness and avoid injury. And check with a fitness professional if you're not sure how much weight is safe for you to use. A general rule of thumb for strength training is to aim for eight to 12 repetitions of each exercise for one to three sets. Your muscles should feel fatigued, but you should be able to finish your repetitions.
  • Increase the load on the muscle gradually over time. For instance, add 10% to 15% to the weight every two weeks.
  • Check with your doctor first if you've had a foot, ankle, or calf muscle injury in the past. Depending on your health or physical condition, certain exercises may not be recommended.

From: Calf-Strengthening Exercises WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Manocchia, P. Firefly Books, 2008. Anatomy of Exercise,

American Council on Exercise: "Will toning shoes really give you a better body?"

American College of Sports Medicine: "Strength Training for Bone, Muscle, and Hormones."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Strength Training for the Knee."

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Lower Body Strength Training Exercises." 

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Alternative Strength Training Exercises."

University of South Carolina, Healthy Carolina Task Force: "Strength Training Basics."

University of North Dakota Wellness Center, Virtual Trainer: "Gastrocnemius/Soleus."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on June 20, 2017

SOURCES:

Manocchia, P. Firefly Books, 2008. Anatomy of Exercise,

American Council on Exercise: "Will toning shoes really give you a better body?"

American College of Sports Medicine: "Strength Training for Bone, Muscle, and Hormones."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Strength Training for the Knee."

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Lower Body Strength Training Exercises." 

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Alternative Strength Training Exercises."

University of South Carolina, Healthy Carolina Task Force: "Strength Training Basics."

University of North Dakota Wellness Center, Virtual Trainer: "Gastrocnemius/Soleus."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on June 20, 2017

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