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What are the three grades of an ankle sprain?

ANSWER

Sprains can range from minor to severe. Your doctor will probably give your sprain one of three "grades" based on the amount of damage:

  • Grade 1: Your ankle will probably feel sore and may be slightly swollen. In this case, the ligament has been overstretched but not torn.
  • Grade 2: You have a partial tear in the ligament. This causes prolonged pain and swelling. It might stop you from putting your full weight on the ankle. You may also notice bruising. This is because the tear has caused bleeding under your skin.
  • Grade 3: This is a full tear of the ankle ligament. You may have heard a popping sound when it happened. This level of sprain causes severe pain, swelling and bruising. Because the ligament is no longer able to do its job, your ankle will feel unstable and can't hold any of your weight.

From: What Is an Ankle Sprain? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Nemours. TeenHealth: “Ankle Sprains.”

Mayo Clinic: “Sprained Ankle.”

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Sprained Ankle." 

American Family Physician.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 14, 2019

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

Nemours. TeenHealth: “Ankle Sprains.”

Mayo Clinic: “Sprained Ankle.”

American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Sprained Ankle." 

American Family Physician.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on March 14, 2019

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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