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Which sports help to build your calf?

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Running, walking, and hiking are excellent calf-strengthening exercises, especially when you go uphill. The steeper the climb, the more your calves have to work. Running sports such as soccer, basketball, and tennis demand that you run, jump, and push off your calf muscles to accelerate or change direction quickly. So they're great for toning calves. Step class and other kinds of dance will work your calves every time you step up and down or bend your knees and push off going from high to low positions. Swimming works the calves along with the rest of the legs muscles. It also avoids the impact of running or jumping. Because it's low-impact, it's also a safe way to strengthen calves if you're recovering from an injury.

From: Calf-Strengthening Exercises WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Manocchia, P. Firefly Books, 2008. Anatomy of Exercise,

American Council on Exercise: "Will toning shoes really give you a better body?"

American College of Sports Medicine: "Strength Training for Bone, Muscle, and Hormones."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Strength Training for the Knee."

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Lower Body Strength Training Exercises." 

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Alternative Strength Training Exercises."

University of South Carolina, Healthy Carolina Task Force: "Strength Training Basics."

University of North Dakota Wellness Center, Virtual Trainer: "Gastrocnemius/Soleus."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on June 20, 2017

SOURCES:

Manocchia, P. Firefly Books, 2008. Anatomy of Exercise,

American Council on Exercise: "Will toning shoes really give you a better body?"

American College of Sports Medicine: "Strength Training for Bone, Muscle, and Hormones."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Strength Training for the Knee."

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Lower Body Strength Training Exercises." 

Georgia State University, department of kinesiology and health: "Alternative Strength Training Exercises."

University of South Carolina, Healthy Carolina Task Force: "Strength Training Basics."

University of North Dakota Wellness Center, Virtual Trainer: "Gastrocnemius/Soleus."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on June 20, 2017

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What are some safety guidelines when doing calf-strengthening exercises?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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