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  • Question 1/11

    Cardio is the only exercise that may help prevent heart disease.

  • Answer 1/11

    Cardio is the only exercise that may help prevent heart disease.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Cardiovascular exercise, also called cardio or aerobic exercise, raises your heart rate and makes you sweat -- and that’s great for your ticker. Regular cardio, whether it’s jogging, cycling, swimming, or brisk walking, will make your heart stronger. It also helps with blood pressure and cholesterol, and can even help ward off some cancers. The American Heart Association recommends that both types of exercise be part of your regimen to help prevent heart disease. 

  • Answer 1/11

    Aerobic means:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your heart’s main job is to deliver oxygen to your body. Aerobic exercise, also called cardio, helps it do this better. It includes any activity that makes your body need more oxygen, like jogging.

  • Question 1/11

    Adults should get at least this much cardio each week:

  • Answer 1/11

    Adults should get at least this much cardio each week:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    That’s 150 minutes of any exercise that makes you breathe harder and revs up your heart rate. Break it up any way you’d like -- do 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- just be sure to move for at least 10 minutes at a time. Can’t get to the magic number? Do what you can. You’re still doing your body good.  

  • Question 1/11

    People with muscles burn more calories.

  • Answer 1/11

    People with muscles burn more calories.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your muscles burn calories even when you’re not working out. So the more muscles you have, the more calories you’ll burn. If you work out with weights often, you’ll also lose fat and look slimmer. Want to turn your bod into a lean, calorie-torching machine? Reach for the dumbbells or hop onto a machine that uses weights.

  • Question 1/11

    You don’t need strength training if you do a lot of cardio.

  • Answer 1/11

    You don’t need strength training if you do a lot of cardio.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Cardio is king when it comes to your heart, but strength (also called resistance) training does wonders for your bones and joints. Get in at least two sessions a week and work your legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms.

  • Answer 1/11

    Which is better for you?

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    • Correct Answer:

    What you tackle first depends on your goals. If you’re training for a 5K, start with cardio. Your muscles will be warmed up, and that may help prevent injuries during strength training. If you’re focused on strength, hit the weights first. Pumping iron before cardio could make you stronger and more toned.

  • Question 1/11

    Which lowers your risk of dementia?

  • Answer 1/11

    Which lowers your risk of dementia?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Whether you swim, run, power through pushups, or use a leg-curl machine, you’re doing something good for your brain. Cardio and strength training can both help you think more clearly and improve your memory.

  • Question 1/11

    Weight training might help keep you from falling when you’re older.

  • Answer 1/11

    Weight training might help keep you from falling when you’re older.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Using weights can lower your chances of osteoporosis, a disease that weakens bones and makes you more likely to fall and have fractures. Training with weights strengthens your bones, helps with your balance, and can make daily tasks easier as you age -- like climbing stairs, getting out of a chair, or lifting groceries.  Other weight-bearing exercises, like walking or dancing, can help with this, too.

  • Question 1/11

    It’s best to go at least this long between strength training workouts:

  • Answer 1/11

    It’s best to go at least this long between strength training workouts:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you lift weights, you get small tears in your muscles. Your body needs time to recover before you lift again. You can keep up the cardio, though.

  • Question 1/11

    You should switch up your weight training routine:

  • Answer 1/11

    You should switch up your weight training routine:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You’ve got to keep your body guessing to get the biggest gains. Changing things up will make you stronger and help prevent injury. If you’re a little bored with your workouts, try different exercises, use heavier weights, or vary the number of repetitions you do.

  • Answer 1/11

    It’s best to lift weights:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Rushing through your reps can lead to injury. Instead, focus on good form. Don’t jerk the weights or use too much force. If you haven't done much work with weights, get some tips from a trainer. For example, remember to breathe. Breathe out as you lift the weight, and breathe in when you lower it.

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    Your training paid off! When it comes to exercise knowledge, you’re in great shape! 

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    You’re moving in the right direction. Put in a bit more work to get the results you’re looking for.

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    Don’t sweat your score. But you may need to study up for a stronger result.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on December 14, 2016 Medically Reviewed on December 14, 2016

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
December 14, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Andresrimaging / Thinkstock (left), Wavebreakmedia Ltd / Thinkstock (right)

 

SOURCES:

American College of Sports Medicine: “A Strength Training Program for Your Home.”

American Heart Association: “American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults.”

CDC: “How Much Physical Activity Do Adults Need?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Cardio vs. Resistance Training: Which Is Healthier?” “I Just Started Exercising -- Why Am I Gaining Weight?” “Osteoporosis.”

Harvard Medical School: “5 of the Best Exercises You Can Ever Do.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “3 Kinds of Exercise That Boost Heart Health,” “6 Heart Benefits of Exercise.”

KidsHealth.org: “Why Exercise is Cool.”

National Osteoporosis Foundation: “Osteoporosis Exercise for Strong Bones.”

Piedmont HealthCare: “Cardio vs. Strength Training for Weight Loss,” “Should You Do Strength Training or Cardio First?”

Smokefree Women: “What Are Strength Training Activities?”

Texas Heart Institute: “Exercise.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.