PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

When should I call my doctor about food poisoning?

ANSWER

Though food poisoning usually goes away on its own, call your doctor if you have any signs of dehydration. For example:

You should also call your doctor if you see any of these symptoms:

Food poisoning is more dangerous for some people than others. It’s best to call a doctor for:

  • Dry mouth or extreme thirst
  • Not peeing much (or at all) or dark, concentrated urine
  • Rapid heartbeat or low blood pressure
  • Weakness, dizziness, or a lightheaded feeling, especially when going from lying down or sitting to standing
  • Confusion
  • Blood in your vomit or poop
  • Blurry vision
  • Diarrhea for more than 3 days
  • Extreme pain or cramps in your belly
  • Fever over 101.5°F
  • Throwing up that won’t stop -- you can’t even keep liquids down
  • Tingling in your arms
  • Weakness in your muscles
  • Adults 60 and older
  • Babies and children
  • People with a chronic illness or weak immune system
  • Pregnant women

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Food Poisoning,” “Food-borne Illness: First Aid.”

NIH: “Why is the neurobiology of nausea and vomiting so important?”

NHS: “Food Poisoning.”

Poison Control: “Food Poisoning.”

KidsHealth: “Food Poisoning,” “Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea,” “Basic Blood Tests.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Food Poisoning.”

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on April 03, 2019

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Food Poisoning,” “Food-borne Illness: First Aid.”

NIH: “Why is the neurobiology of nausea and vomiting so important?”

NHS: “Food Poisoning.”

Poison Control: “Food Poisoning.”

KidsHealth: “Food Poisoning,” “Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea,” “Basic Blood Tests.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Food Poisoning.”

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on April 03, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How is food poisoning treated?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.