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Are pickles high in salt?

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A big drawback with pickles is that they're brimming with salt. Just one large dill pickle has more than 2/3 of the ideal amount of sodium an average adult should have for the whole day. Too much salt in your diet can raise your blood pressure, which in turn ups your chances for heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease. Sodium also can leach calcium from your bones. That can weaken your bones and raises your risk for a broken bone.

SOURCES:

Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs: “History of Pickling.”

Texas A&M University Horticultural Department: “Pickles and Salads Owe a Debt to India.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin A," "Calcium,” ”Potassium," "Vitamin C," "Vitamin K."

U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service: “Basic Report: 11937, Pickles, Cucumber, Dill or Kosher Dill,” “Basic Report: 11940, Pickles, Cucumber, Sweet (Includes Bread and Butter Pickles).”

Exploratorium: “Fascinating Pickle Facts.”

University of Missouri Extension: “How to Pickle.”

Harvard Medical School: “Fermented Foods for Better Gut Health.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “Salt and Sodium.”

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: “ Reflex inhibition of electrically induced muscle cramps in hypohydrated humans.”

The FASEB Journal : “Frozen pickle juice reduces mealtime glycemia in healthy adults.”

Arthritis Foundation: “How to Eat Less Salt.”

Beverages : “Quality Acceptability, Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Carrot-Cucumber Juice.”

Experimental and Clinical Sciences Journal : “An update on the potential health benefits of carotenes.”

Circulation Research : “Serum Beta Carotene and Overall Cause-Specific Mortality.”

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 08, 2019

SOURCES:

Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs: “History of Pickling.”

Texas A&M University Horticultural Department: “Pickles and Salads Owe a Debt to India.”

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin A," "Calcium,” ”Potassium," "Vitamin C," "Vitamin K."

U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service: “Basic Report: 11937, Pickles, Cucumber, Dill or Kosher Dill,” “Basic Report: 11940, Pickles, Cucumber, Sweet (Includes Bread and Butter Pickles).”

Exploratorium: “Fascinating Pickle Facts.”

University of Missouri Extension: “How to Pickle.”

Harvard Medical School: “Fermented Foods for Better Gut Health.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “Salt and Sodium.”

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: “ Reflex inhibition of electrically induced muscle cramps in hypohydrated humans.”

The FASEB Journal : “Frozen pickle juice reduces mealtime glycemia in healthy adults.”

Arthritis Foundation: “How to Eat Less Salt.”

Beverages : “Quality Acceptability, Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Carrot-Cucumber Juice.”

Experimental and Clinical Sciences Journal : “An update on the potential health benefits of carotenes.”

Circulation Research : “Serum Beta Carotene and Overall Cause-Specific Mortality.”

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 08, 2019

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What are the health benefits of pickles?

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