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Can eating tofu help manage hot flashes during menopause?

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Studies show that the estrogens in tofu (and other soy-based foods) cut down how often women in menopause get hot flashes and make them less severe.

From: Health Benefits of Tofu WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

China Culture: "Tofu Culture in China."

Minerals Education Coalition: "Gypsum."

University of California Davis Department of Nutrition: "Nutrition and Health Info Sheet: Soy."

U.S. Department of Agriculture: "USDA Branded Food Products Database."

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health: "Straight Talk about Soy."

University of California Davis Integrative Medicine: "The Essentials -- Part One."

Institute of Food Technologists: "How Tofu Is Processed."

The Vegetarian Resource Group: "Calcium in the Vegan Diet."  

Rogel Cancer Center, Michigan Medicine: "Information About Tofu."

Mayo Clinic: "Healthy eating for kids: Myth #3," "Will eating soy increase my risk of breast cancer?" "Chart of high-fiber foods," "MAOIs and diet: Is it necessary to restrict tyramine?"

American Cancer Society: "Soy and Cancer Risk: Our Expert's Advice," "Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer."

Organic Consumers Association: "Why Middle Age Japanese Women Don't Have Menopausal Hot Flashes: Plant-based Diets High in Phytoestrogens."

Cedars-Sinai: "Endothelial Function Testing."

Michigan State University: "Heath benefits of tofu."

Harvard Health Publishing: "11 foods that lower cholesterol."

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Do Soy Foods Increase Cancer Risk?"

National Cancer Institute: "Prostate-Specific Antigen Test."

Colorado State University Extension: "Nutrient-Drug Interactions and Food."

Vanderbilt University: "Meal Ideas and Menus: Avoiding High-Tyramine Foods Made Easy."

EatFresh.org: "Can you eat tofu raw, or does it need to be cooked (if so, for how long)?"

University of Illinois Extension: "Tofu Shouldn't Scare You?"

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 18, 2019

SOURCES:

China Culture: "Tofu Culture in China."

Minerals Education Coalition: "Gypsum."

University of California Davis Department of Nutrition: "Nutrition and Health Info Sheet: Soy."

U.S. Department of Agriculture: "USDA Branded Food Products Database."

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health: "Straight Talk about Soy."

University of California Davis Integrative Medicine: "The Essentials -- Part One."

Institute of Food Technologists: "How Tofu Is Processed."

The Vegetarian Resource Group: "Calcium in the Vegan Diet."  

Rogel Cancer Center, Michigan Medicine: "Information About Tofu."

Mayo Clinic: "Healthy eating for kids: Myth #3," "Will eating soy increase my risk of breast cancer?" "Chart of high-fiber foods," "MAOIs and diet: Is it necessary to restrict tyramine?"

American Cancer Society: "Soy and Cancer Risk: Our Expert's Advice," "Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer."

Organic Consumers Association: "Why Middle Age Japanese Women Don't Have Menopausal Hot Flashes: Plant-based Diets High in Phytoestrogens."

Cedars-Sinai: "Endothelial Function Testing."

Michigan State University: "Heath benefits of tofu."

Harvard Health Publishing: "11 foods that lower cholesterol."

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Do Soy Foods Increase Cancer Risk?"

National Cancer Institute: "Prostate-Specific Antigen Test."

Colorado State University Extension: "Nutrient-Drug Interactions and Food."

Vanderbilt University: "Meal Ideas and Menus: Avoiding High-Tyramine Foods Made Easy."

EatFresh.org: "Can you eat tofu raw, or does it need to be cooked (if so, for how long)?"

University of Illinois Extension: "Tofu Shouldn't Scare You?"

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 18, 2019

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