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Should you wear gloves when you cut jalapenos?

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Wear gloves when you cut jalapenos. Capsaicin, which is mostly on the inside of the pepper, is hard to wash off your hands and can burn and irritate your eyes, mouth, and nose if you touch them after touching a jalapeno.

SOURCES:

Science: " Starch fossils and the domestication and dispersal of chili peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) in the Americas."

Adrienne Youdim, MD, associate clinical professor of medicine, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine.

Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: "The Complicated Evolutionary History of Spicy Chili Peppers."

Harvard Medical School/Harvard Health Letter: "Hot Stuff Has the Right Stuff." 

World Crops: "Jalapeño Pepper / Capsicum Annum." 

Food Source Information, Colorado Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence: "Jalapeno Peppers." 

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension: "Jalapeno Peppers." 

Food Sense , Utah State University Cooperative Extension: "Jalapeño Peppers." 

United States Department of Agriculture, National Nutrient Database: "Peppers, jalapeño, raw." 

Journal of Dairy Science: "Jalapeno Pepper Pungency as a Quality Control Factor for Process Cheese." 

Surgical Neurology International: "Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief." 

PLOS One : "The Association of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study." 

Lancet Neurology: "NGX-4010, a high-concentration capsaicin patch, for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a randomised, double-blind study." 

Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand: "Effect of chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens) ingestion on plasma glucose response and metabolic rate in Thai women." 

Appetite: "Capsaicinoids and capsinoids. A potential role for weight management? A systematic review of the evidence."

International Journal of Obesity: "Thermogenic ingredients and body weight regulation." 

Journal of Nutrition Science and Vitaminology : "Effects of capsaicin-containing yellow curry sauce on sympathetic nervous system activity and diet-induced thermogenesis in lean and obese young women." 

CDC: "Investigation of Outbreak of Infections Caused by Saintpaul." Salmonella

Neurogastroenterology & Motility : "Effects of chili on postprandial gastrointestinal symptoms in diarrhoea predominant irritable bowel syndrome: evidence for capsaicin-sensitive visceral nociception hypersensitivity."

Aliment Pharmacology & Therapeutics : "The effects of capsaicin on reflux, gastric emptying and dyspepsia."

Reviewed by Kathleen M. Zelman on July 31, 2019

SOURCES:

Science: " Starch fossils and the domestication and dispersal of chili peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) in the Americas."

Adrienne Youdim, MD, associate clinical professor of medicine, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine.

Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: "The Complicated Evolutionary History of Spicy Chili Peppers."

Harvard Medical School/Harvard Health Letter: "Hot Stuff Has the Right Stuff." 

World Crops: "Jalapeño Pepper / Capsicum Annum." 

Food Source Information, Colorado Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence: "Jalapeno Peppers." 

Texas A&M Agrilife Extension: "Jalapeno Peppers." 

Food Sense , Utah State University Cooperative Extension: "Jalapeño Peppers." 

United States Department of Agriculture, National Nutrient Database: "Peppers, jalapeño, raw." 

Journal of Dairy Science: "Jalapeno Pepper Pungency as a Quality Control Factor for Process Cheese." 

Surgical Neurology International: "Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief." 

PLOS One : "The Association of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-Based Cohort Study." 

Lancet Neurology: "NGX-4010, a high-concentration capsaicin patch, for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: a randomised, double-blind study." 

Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand: "Effect of chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens) ingestion on plasma glucose response and metabolic rate in Thai women." 

Appetite: "Capsaicinoids and capsinoids. A potential role for weight management? A systematic review of the evidence."

International Journal of Obesity: "Thermogenic ingredients and body weight regulation." 

Journal of Nutrition Science and Vitaminology : "Effects of capsaicin-containing yellow curry sauce on sympathetic nervous system activity and diet-induced thermogenesis in lean and obese young women." 

CDC: "Investigation of Outbreak of Infections Caused by Saintpaul." Salmonella

Neurogastroenterology & Motility : "Effects of chili on postprandial gastrointestinal symptoms in diarrhoea predominant irritable bowel syndrome: evidence for capsaicin-sensitive visceral nociception hypersensitivity."

Aliment Pharmacology & Therapeutics : "The effects of capsaicin on reflux, gastric emptying and dyspepsia."

Reviewed by Kathleen M. Zelman on July 31, 2019

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Which nutrients are in jalapenos?

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