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What is tempeh made of?

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It's made from partially cooked soybeans and fermented with a type of mold called rhizopus. If you look closely, you'll notice a fuzzy white substance holding tempeh together. That's a safe byproduct of the fungus, called mycelium.

Mold in your food may not sound too appealing, but don't forget, mold and other fungi make several foods, including some cheeses.

From: The Health Benefits of Tempeh WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Nutrients: “Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians,” “Soy, Soy Foods and Their Role in Vegetarian Diets,” “Beyond the Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Soy Protein: A Review of the Effects of Dietary Soy and Its Constituents on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease,” “Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature.”

Cleveland Clinic: “What you need to know about protein.”

Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition : “Tempe, a nutritious and healthy food from Indonesia.”

Foods : “Production, Quality, and Acceptance of Tempeh and White Bean Tempeh Burgers.”

International Journal of Food Properties : “Structural and Functional Properties of Fermented Soybean (Tempeh) by Using Rhizopus oligosporus.”

Frontiers of Microbiology : “Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods.”

USDA: "Tempeh," “Organic Three Grain Tempeh.”

FDA: “Soy Protein.”

Oregon State University: “Soy Isoflavones.”

Journal of American Heart Association : “Cumulative Meta-Analysis of the Soy Effect Over Time.”

Annals of Internal Medicine : “Effect of soybean protein on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.”

The Journal of Nutrition : “Insights Gained from 20 Years of Soy Research.”

Nutrition Research : “Antidiabetic effects of fermented soybean products on type 2 diabetes.”

Forschende Komplementarmedizin : “Impact of Soy Foods on the Development of Breast Cancer and the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients.”

American Cancer Society: “Soy and Cancer Risk: Our Expert’s Advice.”

Thyroid : “Effects of soy protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid function in healthy adults and hypothyroid patients: a review of the relevant literature.”

Gretchen Swank, registered dietitian, Northwestern Medicine.

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on July 10, 2019

SOURCES:

Nutrients: “Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians,” “Soy, Soy Foods and Their Role in Vegetarian Diets,” “Beyond the Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Soy Protein: A Review of the Effects of Dietary Soy and Its Constituents on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease,” “Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature.”

Cleveland Clinic: “What you need to know about protein.”

Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition : “Tempe, a nutritious and healthy food from Indonesia.”

Foods : “Production, Quality, and Acceptance of Tempeh and White Bean Tempeh Burgers.”

International Journal of Food Properties : “Structural and Functional Properties of Fermented Soybean (Tempeh) by Using Rhizopus oligosporus.”

Frontiers of Microbiology : “Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods.”

USDA: "Tempeh," “Organic Three Grain Tempeh.”

FDA: “Soy Protein.”

Oregon State University: “Soy Isoflavones.”

Journal of American Heart Association : “Cumulative Meta-Analysis of the Soy Effect Over Time.”

Annals of Internal Medicine : “Effect of soybean protein on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.”

The Journal of Nutrition : “Insights Gained from 20 Years of Soy Research.”

Nutrition Research : “Antidiabetic effects of fermented soybean products on type 2 diabetes.”

Forschende Komplementarmedizin : “Impact of Soy Foods on the Development of Breast Cancer and the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients.”

American Cancer Society: “Soy and Cancer Risk: Our Expert’s Advice.”

Thyroid : “Effects of soy protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid function in healthy adults and hypothyroid patients: a review of the relevant literature.”

Gretchen Swank, registered dietitian, Northwestern Medicine.

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on July 10, 2019

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