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Why are carrots good for your eyes?

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Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, a compound your body changes into vitamin A, which helps keep your eyes healthy. And beta-carotene helps protect your eyes from the sun and lowers your chances of cataracts and other eye problems.

Yellow carrots have lutein, which has also been proven to be good for your eyes. Studies have found that it can help with or prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S.

From: Health Benefits of Carrots WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

da Silva Dias, J. Vol. 5, Dec. 2014. Food and Nutrition Sciences

The National Gardening Association: "More Colors for Carrots."

U.S. Department of Agriculture Household USDA Fact Sheet: "CARROTS, Fresh."    

U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service: "Basic Report:  11124, Carrots, Raw."

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin K."

University of California San Francisco: "Increasing Fiber Intake."

Mayo Clinic: "Mayo Clinic Minute: Why You Should Pick Carrots for Good Health," "Dietary Fiber: Essential for a Healthy Diet."

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: "5 Top Foods for Eye Health," "Protect Your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition."

Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems (Cultivate Michigan): "Carrots."

Buscemi, S. , Sept.18,  2018. Nutrients

Khoo, H. , Aug. 13, 2017. Food & Nutrition Research

Stanford Children's Health: "Constipation in Children."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Constipation."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Beta-Carotene."

Eroglu, A. , March 14, 2012. Journal of Biological Chemistry

Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group, , April 14, 1994. New England Journal of Medicine

Rasmussen, H. , June 19, 2013. Clinical Interventions in Aging

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 06, 2019

SOURCES: 

da Silva Dias, J. Vol. 5, Dec. 2014. Food and Nutrition Sciences

The National Gardening Association: "More Colors for Carrots."

U.S. Department of Agriculture Household USDA Fact Sheet: "CARROTS, Fresh."    

U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service: "Basic Report:  11124, Carrots, Raw."

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin K."

University of California San Francisco: "Increasing Fiber Intake."

Mayo Clinic: "Mayo Clinic Minute: Why You Should Pick Carrots for Good Health," "Dietary Fiber: Essential for a Healthy Diet."

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: "5 Top Foods for Eye Health," "Protect Your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition."

Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems (Cultivate Michigan): "Carrots."

Buscemi, S. , Sept.18,  2018. Nutrients

Khoo, H. , Aug. 13, 2017. Food & Nutrition Research

Stanford Children's Health: "Constipation in Children."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Constipation."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Beta-Carotene."

Eroglu, A. , March 14, 2012. Journal of Biological Chemistry

Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group, , April 14, 1994. New England Journal of Medicine

Rasmussen, H. , June 19, 2013. Clinical Interventions in Aging

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on August 06, 2019

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