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  • Question 1/10

    The banana plant is:

  • Answer 1/10

    The banana plant is:

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    The plants, which can grow up to 30 feet tall, have an underground stem instead of roots. Smaller stems, called suckers, grow off the main one. After a banana plant bears fruit, the main stem dies and another sucker grows in its place.

  • Question 1/10

    The “trunk” of a banana plant is made of:

  • Answer 1/10

    The “trunk” of a banana plant is made of:

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    Tightly wrapped, overlapping leaves form the plant’s sturdy “trunk.” Called a pseudostem, it can hold up a canopy of more than 20 large leaves and a 100-pound bunch of bananas.

  • Question 1/10

    Bananas have lots of:

  • Answer 1/10

    Bananas have lots of:

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    • Correct Answer:

    This mineral does lots of things for you, like help keep your blood pressure stable and help your muscles work the way they should. It also may lower your chances of getting kidney stones and help prevent bone loss as you get older. Other good sources of potassium include potatoes, tomatoes, and green, leafy vegetables like spinach.

  • Question 1/10

    The potassium in bananas is mildly radioactive.

  • Answer 1/10

    The potassium in bananas is mildly radioactive.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    But it’s a tiny amount, and it only sticks around in your body a few hours. You’d have to eat several hundred to get as much radiation as you’d get from a single chest X-ray.

  • Question 1/10

    A typical banana has this much fat:

  • Answer 1/10

    A typical banana has this much fat:

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    It’s hard to get more low-fat than a banana. A medium-sized one has about 105 calories, with no sodium or cholesterol.

  • Question 1/10

    Ripe bananas have lots of starch.

  • Answer 1/10

    Ripe bananas have lots of starch.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Green bananas have a lot of starch in them. But as they ripen, that gets changed into sugar. While a ripe medium banana has about 14 grams of sugar, it also has fiber, which helps your body absorb the sugar more slowly.

  • Question 1/10

    Bananas get ripe faster if you keep them:

  • Answer 1/10

    Bananas get ripe faster if you keep them:

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    • Correct Answer:

    As a banana ripens, it releases an enzyme called ethylene. That’s a gas that makes it softer and sweeter -- and makes the peel change from green to yellow to brown. Putting bananas in a bag traps the ethylene and speeds up the process.

  • Answer 1/10

    Banana peels may help heal wounds by:

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    People in the Pacific islands once pounded the peels and used them as bandages. Turns out, there was something to that practice -- scientists have found that the peels do have an antibiotic effect.

  • Question 1/10

    Which of these is the banana’s bigger, starchier cousin?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which of these is the banana’s bigger, starchier cousin?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    These look like oversized bananas, but they’re not as sweet, and their texture is a lot like a potato’s. While you may have had them sliced and cooked like potato chips or fried and served for dessert, a healthier way to have them is as a starchy vegetable with meals.

  • Question 1/10

    What’s the biggest threat to banana plants?

  • Answer 1/10

    What’s the biggest threat to banana plants?

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    • Correct Answer:

    A strain of a disease called fusarium wilt attacks the leaves of the banana tree, and it’s had a big effect on the kind found in most grocery stores (Cavendish). Scientists are trying to find ways to stop this strain, which started in Asia and has spread to parts of Africa.

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Sources | Reviewed by Christine Mikstas, LD, RD on October 18, 2019 Medically Reviewed on October 18, 2019

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas, LD, RD on
October 18, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Anettelinnea / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “What Is Potassium?”

Agroforestry Net: “Musa species (banana and plantain).”

American Statistical Association: “Do bananas speed fruit ripening?”

Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations: “Description of the banana plant.”

Food and Nutrition: “The difference between bananas and plantains.”

Glasgow Experimental Particle Physics Laboratory: “Banana Equivalent Dose.”

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture: “Starch and sugar transformation during the ripening of plantains and bananas.”

ProMusa: “Pseudostem.”

Produce for Better Health Foundation: “Plantain: Nutrition, Selection, Storage.”

Queen Mary University of London: “Radioactive Bananas.”

FDA: “Nutrition Information on Raw Fruits for Restaurants & Retail Establishments.”

UCSB Science Line: “What causes banana peels to turn brown?”

University of California at San Francisco: “Sugar Science: Frequently Asked Questions.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.