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  • Question 1/9

    Some vegetables start losing vitamins:

  • Answer 1/9

    Some vegetables start losing vitamins:

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    Don’t let your veggies linger. About half the vitamins can be gone in just a few days if the produce isn’t kept cool or canned. Even items kept in the fridge can lose vitamins in a week or two.

  • Question 1/9

    Fresh spinach is better for you than frozen.

  • Answer 1/9

    Fresh spinach is better for you than frozen.

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    If they’re fully ripe and frozen or canned quickly after being picked, some fruits and veggies can be more nutritious than the fresh ones at the grocery store. Frozen spinach has higher levels of many nutrients, including calcium and vitamin E. Frozen green peas and canned peaches both have more vitamin C than the ones in the produce section. Go ahead and take the easy way out with those!

  • Question 1/9

    It’s safe to eat vegetables that have been frozen for years.

  • Answer 1/9

    It’s safe to eat vegetables that have been frozen for years.

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    • Correct Answer:

    There’s no guarantee they’ll still taste good, though. And they won’t be as good for you as they might have been had you eaten them sooner. If you’re concerned about quality and nutrition, eat veggies stored in a standard freezer/fridge combination within 6 weeks. If they’re in a freezer chest, you can keep them up to 3 months.  

  • Question 1/9

    When you freeze food, it kills bacteria.

  • Answer 1/9

    When you freeze food, it kills bacteria.

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    Temperatures below 0 degrees will keep it from growing. But once the food thaws, bacteria will be back in action, just like nothing ever happened.

  • Question 1/9

    You can refreeze vegetables if they’ve been thawed for less than:

  • Answer 1/9

    You can refreeze vegetables if they’ve been thawed for less than:

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    You also can put them back in the freezer if the package still has ice crystals in it and still feels refrigerator-cold. Otherwise, it’s best to toss them.

  • Question 1/9

    You can keep that can of corn on the shelf:

  • Answer 1/9

    You can keep that can of corn on the shelf:

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    Potatoes, carrots, spinach, beets, peas, and pumpkin should last that long, too. But don’t wait to use canned fruits and vegetables that are high in acid. Juices, tomatoes, grapefruit, pineapple, apples, peaches, pears, plums, berries, and pickles should be eaten within 12 to 18 months.

  • Question 1/9

    You shouldn’t buy cans that are:

  • Answer 1/9

    You shouldn’t buy cans that are:

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    There’s a reason those misfit cans are always the last ones left on the shelf, and it has do with bacteria. A bulge can mean they’re growing inside, and a dent along the seams can be the way they got in.

  • Question 1/9

    Some canned vegetables you buy at the grocery store may have lead in them.

  • Answer 1/9

    Some canned vegetables you buy at the grocery store may have lead in them.

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    • Correct Answer:

    The U.S. made food companies stop using lead in cans in 1995. But some countries still allow it, and those can be sold here. Watch out for cans with wide silver-gray seams (where the body and lid overlap). Over time, the lead can leak into the food inside.

  • Question 1/9

    This works well for freezing food:

  • Answer 1/9

    This works well for freezing food:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The wrong container can lead to freezer burn and make your fruits and veggies smell weird – and no one wants that. Put them in something that’s easy to seal, keeps out water and air, and will stand up to the extreme temperature of your freezer.

    Make sure to get wide-mouth, dual-purpose glass jars made specifically for freezing and canning. Other good options are plastic freezer containers and freezer bags.

  • Your Score:

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Well done! Your knowledge of canning and freezing is well-preserved.

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    Not bad, but you might want to consult Grandma and try again.

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    Oh no -- brain freeze! Thaw out a bit and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Christine Mikstas, LD, RD on June 28, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 28, 2018

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas, LD, RD on
June 28, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) (left to right) Bojsha65 / Thinkstock, izzzy71 / Thinkstock, jirkaejc / Thinkstock

SOURCES:

Alabama Cooperative Extension Service: “The Do’s and Don’ts of Freezing Foods.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Fresh, Canned or Frozen Produce?”

FoodSafety.gov: “Frozen Food and Power Outages: When to Save and When to Throw Out.”

Food Safety Information Council: “Freezer Times.”

National Center for Home Food Preservation: “Frequently Asked Freezing Questions.”

New York State Department of Health: “Sources of Lead.”

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service: “Preserving Food: Freezing Vegetables.”

U.S. Department of Agriculture: “Complete Guide to Home Canning,” “Shelf-Stable Food Safety.”

FDA: “Surplus, Salvaged, and Donated Foods: Safety Tips.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.