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How can COBRA help me keep my insurance when I lose my job?

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COBRA is a law that lets you keep health insurance from your old job for up to 18 months. You must sign up for COBRA within 60 days of losing your job. If your former employer had fewer than 20 employees, you may not be eligible for COBRA.

Using COBRA will cost you more than you were paying while you worked. When you were working, your company may have paid part of your premium. Now that you're not working, you'll have to pay both your part of the premium and the part that your ex-employer paid.

From: Health Insurance When You're Out of Work WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

HealthCare.gov: "Young Adult Coverage;" "Young Adults and the Affordable Care Ac;," "Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP);" and "What's Changing and When."

U.S. Department of Labor: "Frequently Asked Questions: COBRA Continuation Health Coverage;" "FAQ About Portability of Health Coverage and HIPAA;" and "Fact Sheet: Job Loss -- Important Information Workers Need to Know to Protect Their Health Coverage and Retirement Benefits."

Whitehouse.gov: "A More Secure Future: Relief for You."

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on February 14, 2018

SOURCES:

HealthCare.gov: "Young Adult Coverage;" "Young Adults and the Affordable Care Ac;," "Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP);" and "What's Changing and When."

U.S. Department of Labor: "Frequently Asked Questions: COBRA Continuation Health Coverage;" "FAQ About Portability of Health Coverage and HIPAA;" and "Fact Sheet: Job Loss -- Important Information Workers Need to Know to Protect Their Health Coverage and Retirement Benefits."

Whitehouse.gov: "A More Secure Future: Relief for You."

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on February 14, 2018

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How can I enroll in my spouse or partner's health insurance plan when I’m out of work?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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