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How can I keep health coverage going for myself and my kids after a divorce?

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  • Sometimes, health insurance can be included in a divorce settlement.
  • You may be able to temporarily keep your health coverage through a law known as "COBRA." But insurance through COBRA can be expensive.
  • To get COBRA coverage, you must tell the health plan administrator within 60 days of your divorce.
  • It may be cheaper to sign up with your own employer's plan rather than pay premiums from the plan of your ex-spouse.
  • Ask your job’s human resources department about post-divorce coverage.

From: Insurance Tips When You Get Divorced WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Institute of Certified Public Accountants: "Health Insurance and Divorce."

Department of Labor: "Frequently Asked Questions: COBRA Continuation Health Coverage," "Qualified Medical Child Support Orders."

TIAA-CREFF: "Tips for financial security after a divorce."

Women's Institute for Financial Education: "Maintaining Your Health Insurance after Divorce."

National Association of Insurance Commissioners: "Health Insurance Open Enrollment."

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on February 16, 2018

SOURCES:

American Institute of Certified Public Accountants: "Health Insurance and Divorce."

Department of Labor: "Frequently Asked Questions: COBRA Continuation Health Coverage," "Qualified Medical Child Support Orders."

TIAA-CREFF: "Tips for financial security after a divorce."

Women's Institute for Financial Education: "Maintaining Your Health Insurance after Divorce."

National Association of Insurance Commissioners: "Health Insurance Open Enrollment."

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on February 16, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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