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How can human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) affect the way I eat?

ANSWER

HIV can cause painful sores or infections inside your mouth or in your esophagus, making it difficult to swallow. Medications may also cause nausea and diarrhea, leaving you with little interest in eating.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

von Haehling, S. , Jan. 15, 2007, online edition. Cardiovascular Research

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Eating, Diet, and Nutrition for GER and GERD.”

National Cancer Institute: “Nutrition in cancer care.”

National Library of Medicine: “Swallowing Disorders.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is COPD?”

Wust, R. , September 2007. International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Cleveland Clinic: “Nutritional Guidelines for People with COPD.”

American Stroke Association: “Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia).”

National Kidney Foundation: “How Your Kidneys Work;” “Kidney Disease;” and “Nutrition and Kidney Disease, Stages 1-4.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Food, Eating, and Alzheimer’s.”

National Parkinson Foundation: “Non-motor symptoms.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

National Parkinson’s Foundation: “Constipation in Parkinson’s Disease.”

Tjaden, K. 2008, Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation,

UpToDate: “Patient Information: Symptoms of HIV Infection (Beyond the Basics).”

Dejesus, E. , June 2007. Journal of International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care

UCSF HIV InSite: “Diet and Nutrition.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Could It Be My Thyroid?”

American Thyroid Association: “Thyroid and Weight.”

Hepatitis Foundation International: “Living With Hepatitis.”

National Library of Medicine: “Hepatitis.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 4, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

von Haehling, S. , Jan. 15, 2007, online edition. Cardiovascular Research

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Eating, Diet, and Nutrition for GER and GERD.”

National Cancer Institute: “Nutrition in cancer care.”

National Library of Medicine: “Swallowing Disorders.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is COPD?”

Wust, R. , September 2007. International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Cleveland Clinic: “Nutritional Guidelines for People with COPD.”

American Stroke Association: “Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia).”

National Kidney Foundation: “How Your Kidneys Work;” “Kidney Disease;” and “Nutrition and Kidney Disease, Stages 1-4.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Food, Eating, and Alzheimer’s.”

National Parkinson Foundation: “Non-motor symptoms.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

National Parkinson’s Foundation: “Constipation in Parkinson’s Disease.”

Tjaden, K. 2008, Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation,

UpToDate: “Patient Information: Symptoms of HIV Infection (Beyond the Basics).”

Dejesus, E. , June 2007. Journal of International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care

UCSF HIV InSite: “Diet and Nutrition.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Could It Be My Thyroid?”

American Thyroid Association: “Thyroid and Weight.”

Hepatitis Foundation International: “Living With Hepatitis.”

National Library of Medicine: “Hepatitis.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 4, 2020

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How do hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism affect my appetite and weight?

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