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How can swimmer's ear cause conductive hearing loss?

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Your doctor may call swimmer’s ear "otitis externa." Water causes this infection of the outer ear canal. If your ear swells a lot, you might lose some hearing.

From: Types of Hearing Loss WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Quick Statistics About Hearing.”

American Speech-Language Hearing Association: “Types, Degree, and Configuration of Hearing Loss.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Types, Causes and Treatment.”

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Hearing Loss and Older Adults.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Acoustic Neuroma.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.”

PubMed: "Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss: the otology-rheumatology interface."

Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center: “Sudden hearing loss.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery: “Conductive Hearing Loss: Causes and Treatments.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 1, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Quick Statistics About Hearing.”

American Speech-Language Hearing Association: “Types, Degree, and Configuration of Hearing Loss.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Types, Causes and Treatment.”

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Hearing Loss and Older Adults.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Acoustic Neuroma.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.”

PubMed: "Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss: the otology-rheumatology interface."

Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center: “Sudden hearing loss.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery: “Conductive Hearing Loss: Causes and Treatments.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 1, 2019

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What things are stuck in the ear canal that can cause conductive hearing loss?

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