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How can you support a loved one with hearing loss?

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Here are some ways you can help a loved one adjust to hearing loss:

  • Acknowledge their hearing loss.
  • Change the way you communicate. Face the person directly, get their attention before you talk, pick quiet spots for conversations, and speak clearly.
  • Encourage them to connect with others who have hearing loss.
  • Check out aural rehabilitation. Also called audiologic rehabilitation, these services teach people to adjust to hearing loss, learn how to use hearing aids and other helpful devices, manage conversations, and improve their communication.
  • Be patient. It takes time to adjust to hearing loss. If your loved one seems hesitant to make changes, know that it’s normal. Stay positive and supportive.

From: How to Support Better Hearing WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Hearing Loss Association of America: "Living with Hearing Loss."

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: "Communicating with People with Hearing Loss."

Cleveland Clinic: "Tips to Improve Communication when Talking with Someone with Hearing Loss."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Adult Aural/Audiologic Rehabilitation.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 01, 2019

SOURCES:

Hearing Loss Association of America: "Living with Hearing Loss."

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: "Communicating with People with Hearing Loss."

Cleveland Clinic: "Tips to Improve Communication when Talking with Someone with Hearing Loss."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Adult Aural/Audiologic Rehabilitation.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 01, 2019

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Should you mention it if someone seems to have hearing loss?

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