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How common is depression caused by aging?

ANSWER

It’s not an unavoidable part of getting older. About 1 in 20 Americans 60 and older has depression, the lowest rate of any age group. But many depressed seniors don’t get diagnosed. Older Americans themselves and their doctors may dismiss any symptoms as a natural reaction to illnesses and life’s setbacks.

SOURCES:

CDC: "What You Should Know and Do this Flu Season If You Are 65 Years and Older,” "Flu Symptoms & Complications,” "Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older,” “Depression in the U.S. Household Population, 2009-2012,” “Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older.”

Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics : "Health consequences of obesity in the elderly.”

American Heart Association: "About Metabolic Syndrome.”

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Bone Health Basics: Get the Facts.”

Dana Farber Cancer Institute: "Why Does Cancer Risk Increase As We Get Older?”

National Institutes of Health: "Age-Related Eye Diseases,” "Age-Related Hearing Loss.”

Wake Forest Baptist Health: "Age-Related Heart Disease.”

The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : “Exergames for Subsyndromal Depression in Older Adults: A Pilot Study of a Novel Intervention.”

BioMed Central : “Does treatment of subsyndromal depression improve depression and diabetes related outcomes: protocol for a randomised controlled comparison of psycho-education, physical exercise and treatment as usual.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 24, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: "What You Should Know and Do this Flu Season If You Are 65 Years and Older,” "Flu Symptoms & Complications,” "Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older,” “Depression in the U.S. Household Population, 2009-2012,” “Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older.”

Journal of Clinical Gerontology and Geriatrics : "Health consequences of obesity in the elderly.”

American Heart Association: "About Metabolic Syndrome.”

National Osteoporosis Foundation: "Bone Health Basics: Get the Facts.”

Dana Farber Cancer Institute: "Why Does Cancer Risk Increase As We Get Older?”

National Institutes of Health: "Age-Related Eye Diseases,” "Age-Related Hearing Loss.”

Wake Forest Baptist Health: "Age-Related Heart Disease.”

The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : “Exergames for Subsyndromal Depression in Older Adults: A Pilot Study of a Novel Intervention.”

BioMed Central : “Does treatment of subsyndromal depression improve depression and diabetes related outcomes: protocol for a randomised controlled comparison of psycho-education, physical exercise and treatment as usual.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 24, 2018

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