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How does aging affect your bladder?

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You might find it harder to control your bladder. This is called “urinary incontinence.” It happens to an estimated 10% of people 65 or older.

Many of these people get a little leakage when they cough or sneeze, but some lose a large amount of pee before they can get to the bathroom. For women, menopause can be a factor. For men, an enlarged prostate might be the issue.

You might also notice that you’re not as regular as you used to be. Some conditions, such as diabetes, can slow down your bowels. Some medicines might make you constipated. These include medicines that treat blood pressure, seizures, Parkinson disease, and depression. Iron supplements and narcotic pain medicines can also lead to constipation.

From: What's Normal Aging? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Aging: What to Expect.”

National Institutes of Health Medline Plus: “Areas of Age-Related Change.”

University of Cincinnati College of Nursing: “Aging: Age-Related Physical Changes.”

Merck Manual: “Changes in the Body With Aging.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Effects of Aging.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 06, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Aging: What to Expect.”

National Institutes of Health Medline Plus: “Areas of Age-Related Change.”

University of Cincinnati College of Nursing: “Aging: Age-Related Physical Changes.”

Merck Manual: “Changes in the Body With Aging.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Effects of Aging.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 06, 2018

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How can you keep your bladder healthy as you age?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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