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How is pulsatile tinnitus diagnosed?

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You may need to see an ear specialist called an otolaryngologist. You’ll have a hearing test, and the doctor will check your ears. She may also look at your jaw and check your eyes for signs of increased pressure in your brain.

Other tests might include:

  • Brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER), which times electrical waves from your brain in response to clicks in your ear
  • Electrocochleography, which is similar to BAER but uses an electrode placed on or in your eardrum
  • Scans of your brain and blood vessels, such as an MRI or CT scan
  • Blood tests

From: What Is Pulsatile Tinnitus? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Tinnitus.”

Weill and Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Pulsatile Tinnitus.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tinnitus.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International : "Pulsatile Tinnitus: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis.”

British Tinnitus Association: “Pulsatile Tinnitus,” “Sound therapy.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Tinnitus,” “Hearing Testing.”

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 20, 2017

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Tinnitus.”

Weill and Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Pulsatile Tinnitus.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tinnitus.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International : "Pulsatile Tinnitus: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis.”

British Tinnitus Association: “Pulsatile Tinnitus,” “Sound therapy.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Tinnitus,” “Hearing Testing.”

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 20, 2017

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How is pulsatile tinnitus treated?

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