PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is airplane ear?

ANSWER

Airplane ear is that feeling of pressure in your ears when an airplane is takes off and lands. It happens when the air pressure in your middle ear and the air pressure around you aren't balanced.

Anything that limits the way your eustachian tube works can bring it on. Some things can cause it are:

Airplane ear usually goes away when you yawn, swallow, or chew gum. If it seems severe, call your doctor.

  • Diving
  • Middle ear infection (a.k.a. otitis media)
  • Sinus infection
  • Common cold
  • Hay fever

From: Why Is My Hearing Muffled? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Ear Wax and Care."

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Ear Wax."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Causes of Hearing Loss in Adults."

American Tinnitus Association: "Causes," "Treatment Options," "Understanding the Facts."

Cleveland Clinic: "Cerumen Impaction."

Mayo Clinic: "Airplane Ear," "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Age-Related Hearing Loss," "Noise-Induced Hearing Loss."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 01, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Ear Wax and Care."

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Ear Wax."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Causes of Hearing Loss in Adults."

American Tinnitus Association: "Causes," "Treatment Options," "Understanding the Facts."

Cleveland Clinic: "Cerumen Impaction."

Mayo Clinic: "Airplane Ear," "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Age-Related Hearing Loss," "Noise-Induced Hearing Loss."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 01, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Is noise damage causing your hearing to be muffled?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: