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What are some good habits that can help ease back pain?

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These habits can help keep pain away:

Sleep on your back or side. Don’t lie on your stomach if you have neck pain.

While driving, sit up straight, head against the headrest.

At a computer, keep what you're viewing at eye level.

For hobbies, take a break if you look down for a long time. Stretch about every 20 minutes. While gardening, half-kneel or squat, and take frequent breaks.

While cleaning, half-kneel or squat.

Don't slouch while watching TV. Get up from time to time and walk around.

From: Rehab to Ease Back Pain WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Back Pain."

Group Health Cooperative: "Physical Therapy."

Cleveland Clinic: "What Can Physical Therapy Do For Your Back & Neck Pain."

University of Arizona -- Health Sciences: "Treating and Preventing Complex and Common Forms of Back Pain."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Lumbar Spinal Stenosis."

Harvard Health Publications/Harvard Medical School: "Physical therapy as good as surgery and less risky for one type of lower back pain."

American Physical Therapy Association: "Early Guideline-Based Physical Therapy Results in Health Care Savings for Patients With LBP."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 20, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Back Pain."

Group Health Cooperative: "Physical Therapy."

Cleveland Clinic: "What Can Physical Therapy Do For Your Back & Neck Pain."

University of Arizona -- Health Sciences: "Treating and Preventing Complex and Common Forms of Back Pain."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Lumbar Spinal Stenosis."

Harvard Health Publications/Harvard Medical School: "Physical therapy as good as surgery and less risky for one type of lower back pain."

American Physical Therapy Association: "Early Guideline-Based Physical Therapy Results in Health Care Savings for Patients With LBP."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 20, 2018

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