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What is a dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) test?

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This blood test is often done for women who seem to have too many male hormones. It can also be done when a woman has a low sex drive and when a boy starts puberty too early.

DHEA stands for dehydroepiandrosterone. This is a hormone found in the adrenal glands, above the kidneys. DHEA helps to make other hormones, like testosterone in men and estrogen in women. Your natural DHEA levels are highest when you're a young adult. They get lower as you age. In your adrenal glands and liver, DHEA changes to DHEA-S (DHEA-sulfate).

The DHEA-S test is done to check whether your adrenal glands are working well. It measures the amount of DHEA-S in your bloodstream.

From: What Is a DHEA Test? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "DHEA."

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "DHEAS."

University of Rochester: "Dehydroepiandrosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate."

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: "Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperandrogenic Disorders."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 30, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "DHEA."

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "DHEAS."

University of Rochester: "Dehydroepiandrosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate."

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: "Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperandrogenic Disorders."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 30, 2018

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What are the symptoms of high dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) levels in women?

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