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What is pulsatile tinnitus?

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If you have a thumping or whooshing sound in one or both ears that seems to follow a steady beat, you may have this rare form of tinnitus. Like regular tinnitus, you hear a constant sound that others don’t. But with the pulsatile form of this condition, the noise comes from inside your body. Your doctor may be able to hear it, too, if she listens with a stethoscope. It’s also called rhythmic, vascular, or pulse-synchronous tinnitus.

From: What Is Pulsatile Tinnitus? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Tinnitus.”

Weill and Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Pulsatile Tinnitus.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tinnitus.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International : "Pulsatile Tinnitus: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis.”

British Tinnitus Association: “Pulsatile Tinnitus,” “Sound therapy.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Tinnitus,” “Hearing Testing.”

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 20, 2017

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Tinnitus.”

Weill and Cornell Brain and Spine Center: “Pulsatile Tinnitus.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tinnitus.”

Deutsches Arzteblatt International : "Pulsatile Tinnitus: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis.”

British Tinnitus Association: “Pulsatile Tinnitus,” “Sound therapy.”

American Hearing Research Foundation: “Tinnitus,” “Hearing Testing.”

National Eye Institute: “Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 20, 2017

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What are the symptoms of pulsatile tinnitus?

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