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What levels of care does hospice offer?

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Hospice offers four levels of care, two of which happen at home. The four levels are:

You might decide you or your loved one wishes to stay where friends and family can visit freely. In fact, most people choose this option. A relative or friend usually serves as the primary caregiver.

  • Routine Home Care. The most common level of hospice care, this includes nursing and home health aide services.
  • Continuous Home Care. This is when a patient needs continuous nursing care during a time of crisis.
  • General Inpatient Care. Short-term care during times when pain and symptoms can’t be managed without a hospital setting.
  • Respite Care. Short-term care in a facility during times when the patient’s caregiver needs a break in caregiving.

From: What Is Hospice Care? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Caring Connections: "Hospice Care: A Consumer's Guide to Selecting a Hospice Program," "What Is Hospice?"

Medicaid.gov: “Hospice Benefits.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hospice Care: Comforting the Terminally Ill,” National Institute on Aging: "Finding Care at the End of Life."

Palliativedoctors.org: "When to Seek Hospice Care."

National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization: "2010 Edition: NHPCO Facts and Figures: Hospice Care in America."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 06, 2018

SOURCES:

Caring Connections: "Hospice Care: A Consumer's Guide to Selecting a Hospice Program," "What Is Hospice?"

Medicaid.gov: “Hospice Benefits.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hospice Care: Comforting the Terminally Ill,” National Institute on Aging: "Finding Care at the End of Life."

Palliativedoctors.org: "When to Seek Hospice Care."

National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization: "2010 Edition: NHPCO Facts and Figures: Hospice Care in America."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 06, 2018

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What happens once you're in hospice?

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