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When is it OK to split a pill?

ANSWER

In general, these three signs mean that a pill is safe to split:

1. FDA approval (It will be printed on the package insert.)

2. Thumbs-up from your doctor or pharmacist

3. A line scored down the middle makes pills easier to split evenly.

From: Guide to Pill Splitting WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:                                                                                                                               

Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy: "Professional Practice Advisory on Tablet Splitting."

FDA: "Consumer Updates -- Tablet Splitting: A Risky Practice."

American Society of Consultant Pharmacists: "Tablet Splitting for Cost Containment."

Grissinger M. February 2010. Pharmacy and Therapeutics,

American Medical News: "Cost vs. compliance: Physicians encouraged to discuss prescriptions."

Consumer Reports: "Pill Splitting."

Premera Blue Cross: "Save on Copays with Tablet Splitting Program."

UnitedHealthcare Half Tablet Program.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on June 09, 2018

SOURCES:                                                                                                                               

Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy: "Professional Practice Advisory on Tablet Splitting."

FDA: "Consumer Updates -- Tablet Splitting: A Risky Practice."

American Society of Consultant Pharmacists: "Tablet Splitting for Cost Containment."

Grissinger M. February 2010. Pharmacy and Therapeutics,

American Medical News: "Cost vs. compliance: Physicians encouraged to discuss prescriptions."

Consumer Reports: "Pill Splitting."

Premera Blue Cross: "Save on Copays with Tablet Splitting Program."

UnitedHealthcare Half Tablet Program.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on June 09, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Which pills shouldn't be split?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.