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Why do women 50 and older need a pap test?

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This test checks for cervical cancer, which is easy to treat when caught early. You’re less likely to get cervical cancer as you age, but you still need to continue with routine Pap smears even after menopause.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says women ages 21 to 65 should have a Pap test every 3 years. Women ages 30 to 65 may get screened every 5 years using a combination of Pap test and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing if both tests are negative the first time you take them. If you have a higher risk of cancer, you may need a Pap test more often.

SOURCES:

AARP: "What Health Screenings Do You Really Need if You Are Over Age 50?"

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Women: Stay Healthy at 50+."

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Statistics."

American Psychological Association: "Aging and Depression."

American Heart Association.

American Cancer Society.

CDC: "Leading Causes of Death."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Colon Cancer."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Older Adults: Depression and Suicide Facts (Fact Sheet)."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Prevent Cancer Foundation: "Frequently Asked Questions: Exactly what is a 'pre-cancerous' polyp? If the polyp is removed, does that mean I am cured?"

John Hopkins University: "Cervical Cancer."

CDC.

American Cancer Society: “Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests.”

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: “Osteoporosis: Screening.”

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: “Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Consumer Guide.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on September 17, 2018

SOURCES:

AARP: "What Health Screenings Do You Really Need if You Are Over Age 50?"

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Women: Stay Healthy at 50+."

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Statistics."

American Psychological Association: "Aging and Depression."

American Heart Association.

American Cancer Society.

CDC: "Leading Causes of Death."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Colon Cancer."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Older Adults: Depression and Suicide Facts (Fact Sheet)."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Prevent Cancer Foundation: "Frequently Asked Questions: Exactly what is a 'pre-cancerous' polyp? If the polyp is removed, does that mean I am cured?"

John Hopkins University: "Cervical Cancer."

CDC.

American Cancer Society: “Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests.”

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: “Osteoporosis: Screening.”

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: “Screening for Colorectal Cancer: Consumer Guide.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on September 17, 2018

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Why do people 50 and older need a bone mineral density scan?

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