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Why is it important to get help for hearing problems as soon as possible?

ANSWER

Hearing problems can be worse -- sometimes even permanent -- if you ignore them. And if you're doing something that hurts your ears without realizing it, the sooner you find out the better. Sometimes even everyday drugs like aspirin or antibiotics can cause trouble.

If you take care of hearing problems early, the cure may be easier. For example, a common problem is nerve damage. If you see a doctor right away, you might get better just by taking pills, instead of needing surgery or hearing aids.

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Causes of Hearing Loss in Children,” “Untreated Hearing Loss in Adults-A Growing National Epidemic.” 

Better Hearing Institute: “Across America Hearing Check Challenge,”  “The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life,”  “Myths about Hearing Loss,“ “Prevalence of Hearing Loss.”

CDC: “Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis,” “Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention  Services.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Hearing Help: Prevention of Hearing Loss.”

National Institutes of Health: “Noise-induced Hearing Loss.”

The Scripps Research Institute: “Deafness and Hearing Loss Research.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Hearing Loss.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on February 19, 2018

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Causes of Hearing Loss in Children,” “Untreated Hearing Loss in Adults-A Growing National Epidemic.” 

Better Hearing Institute: “Across America Hearing Check Challenge,”  “The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life,”  “Myths about Hearing Loss,“ “Prevalence of Hearing Loss.”

CDC: “Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis,” “Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention  Services.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Hearing Help: Prevention of Hearing Loss.”

National Institutes of Health: “Noise-induced Hearing Loss.”

The Scripps Research Institute: “Deafness and Hearing Loss Research.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Hearing Loss.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on February 19, 2018

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I don’t like hearing aids. How can one help me?

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