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Why should I treat my child’s hearing loss early?

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Early hearing loss treatment is key for children. Bad hearing can affect how they talk, make friends, and develop. Babies should be tested in the hospital when they’re born, or at least by the time they're a month old. If there is a problem, they need professional help before they’re 6 months old.

Keep an eye out if your toddler has lots of ear infections. Hearing loss from ear infections is usually temporary, but it can cause lasting problems if it comes when they’re learning critical skills.

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Causes of Hearing Loss in Children,” “Untreated Hearing Loss in Adults-A Growing National Epidemic.” 

Better Hearing Institute: “Across America Hearing Check Challenge,”  “The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life,”  “Myths about Hearing Loss,“ “Prevalence of Hearing Loss.”

CDC: “Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis,” “Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention  Services.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Hearing Help: Prevention of Hearing Loss.”

National Institutes of Health: “Noise-induced Hearing Loss.”

The Scripps Research Institute: “Deafness and Hearing Loss Research.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Hearing Loss.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on February 19, 2018

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Causes of Hearing Loss in Children,” “Untreated Hearing Loss in Adults-A Growing National Epidemic.” 

Better Hearing Institute: “Across America Hearing Check Challenge,”  “The Impact of Treated Hearing Loss on Quality of Life,”  “Myths about Hearing Loss,“ “Prevalence of Hearing Loss.”

CDC: “Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis,” “Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention  Services.”

Hearing Loss Association of America: “Hearing Help: Prevention of Hearing Loss.”

National Institutes of Health: “Noise-induced Hearing Loss.”

The Scripps Research Institute: “Deafness and Hearing Loss Research.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Hearing Loss.”

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on February 19, 2018

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