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How does exercise cause your hear to skip a beat?

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Your heart rate rises when you work out hard. You might feel palpitations before and after exercising, but not during -- that's because the extra heartbeats aren’t noticeable when your heart rates is up. When you stop working out, your heart rate slows down again, but your adrenaline level stays high, so you may feel your ticker beating really rapidly.

From: What Are Heart Palpitations? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics: "Heart Palpitations: Frequently Asked Questions."

Main Line Health: "Heart Palpitations: How Common Are They and Should You Worry?"

American Heart Association: "Warning Signs of a Heart Attack," "What is Atrial Fibrillation?" "What's the link between chronic stress and heart disease?"

National Library of Medicine:  "Heart Attack First Aid," "Atrial Fibrillation."

Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute: "When to Evaluate Heart Palpitations."

Brown University Health Promotion:  "Caffeine." 

Harvard Health Publications:  "Skipping a beat - the surprise of palpitations."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2018

SOURCES: 

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics: "Heart Palpitations: Frequently Asked Questions."

Main Line Health: "Heart Palpitations: How Common Are They and Should You Worry?"

American Heart Association: "Warning Signs of a Heart Attack," "What is Atrial Fibrillation?" "What's the link between chronic stress and heart disease?"

National Library of Medicine:  "Heart Attack First Aid," "Atrial Fibrillation."

Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute: "When to Evaluate Heart Palpitations."

Brown University Health Promotion:  "Caffeine." 

Harvard Health Publications:  "Skipping a beat - the surprise of palpitations."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2018

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When is skipping a heart beat a warning sign of something serious?

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