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How much alcohol is safe for someone with atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

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After you've been diagnosed, it's OK to have an adult beverage, as long as you don't drink too much. Keep in mind that different drinks have different levels of alcohol. A single shot of hard liquor may have the same amount of alcohol as two glasses of wine.

One to two drinks a day probably won't lead to health problems, even when you already have atrial fibrillation (AFib). More than three drinks a day, though, can trigger an episode.

If you're taking blood thinners, alcohol can raise your risk of bleeding. It can also be a problem if you take drugs that reduce blood clotting, like warfarin or acenocoumarol.

From: Does Alcohol Cause AFib? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

Larsson, S. , July 2014. Journal of the American College of Cardiology

European Heart Rhythm Association/AFib Matters: "Living With Atrial Fibrillation."

StopAFib.org: "What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?"

NHS Choices: "Alcohol Unit Calculator."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on May 9, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

Larsson, S. , July 2014. Journal of the American College of Cardiology

European Heart Rhythm Association/AFib Matters: "Living With Atrial Fibrillation."

StopAFib.org: "What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?"

NHS Choices: "Alcohol Unit Calculator."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on May 9, 2018

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How can drinking every day affect someone with atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

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