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What are the treatments for premature atrial contractions (PAC)?

ANSWER

If your test results show that you have other heart-related problems, your doctor will recommend a treatment plan for you. Most of the time, though, PACs don’t need treatment.

If you have severe symptoms or find them bothersome, treatments can include:

Lifestyle changes. Lower stress, stop smoking, cut back on caffeine, and treat other health issues like sleep apnea and high blood pressure.

Medicines for arrhythmia. Take medications that are used to cut down on or end premature heartbeats.

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Premature Contractions -- PACs and PVCs."

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute: "Types of Arrhythmia."

University of Wisconsin Hospital: "Premature Ventricular Contractions, PVCs; Premature Atrial Contractions, PACs."

Allina Health System: "Premature Atrial Contractions."

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: "Premature Heartbeats."

Merck Manual: “Atrial Premature Beats.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Premature Contractions -- PACs and PVCs."

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute: "Types of Arrhythmia."

University of Wisconsin Hospital: "Premature Ventricular Contractions, PVCs; Premature Atrial Contractions, PACs."

Allina Health System: "Premature Atrial Contractions."

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: "Premature Heartbeats."

Merck Manual: “Atrial Premature Beats.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 17, 2018

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