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What can I expect right before and during my surgical ablation?

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At the hospital, your nurse may test your blood or urine or perform a chest X-ray to make sure you don’t have any infections or problems that may hurt your surgery’s success. You may be given a drug to help you relax before the surgery. Electrocardiogram (EKG) electrodes will be attached to your chest and back to keep track of your heartbeat. You will receive anesthesia to put you to sleep during the surgery. After you are put to sleep, your doctor will connect you to a respirator that has a tube that goes down your throat. This will help you breathe during the operation. You may have a tube inserted into your throat to help collect fluid or air in your stomach during the operation. You may also have a catheter inserted in your bladder to collect urine during the operation. Your surgeon will cut into your chest during your operation, and he or she will insert instruments to make the small interior cuts or make lesions on your heart tissue. Depending on the type of maze procedure you have, your surgeon may use tiny video cameras or robotic arms to help perform the operation.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Surgical Procedures for Atrial Fibrillation (MAZE).”

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine: “A Patient's Guide to Heart Surgery,” “Robotic-Assisted MAZE Surgery.”

Society of Thoracic Surgeons: “Atrial Fibrillation Surgery - Maze Procedure.”

Cedars-Sinai Hospital: “Preparing for Maze Surgery.”

American Heart Association: “Treatment Guidelines of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF).”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on July 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Surgical Procedures for Atrial Fibrillation (MAZE).”

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine: “A Patient's Guide to Heart Surgery,” “Robotic-Assisted MAZE Surgery.”

Society of Thoracic Surgeons: “Atrial Fibrillation Surgery - Maze Procedure.”

Cedars-Sinai Hospital: “Preparing for Maze Surgery.”

American Heart Association: “Treatment Guidelines of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF).”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on July 25, 2017

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