PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What causes premature atrial contractions (PAC)?

ANSWER

Doctors don’t always know the cause. But these things can make PACs more likely:

Usually, premature atrial contractions have no clear cause and no health risks. In most cases, premature atrial contractions aren’t a sign of heart disease and just happen naturally.

  • Pregnancy
  • High blood pressure, heart disease, or hyperthyroidism
  • Stress or fatigue
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Cold or hay fever medicine
  • Asthma medicine
  • Dehydration

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Premature Contractions -- PACs and PVCs."

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute: "Types of Arrhythmia."

University of Wisconsin Hospital: "Premature Ventricular Contractions, PVCs; Premature Atrial Contractions, PACs."

Allina Health System: "Premature Atrial Contractions."

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: "Premature Heartbeats."

Merck Manual: “Atrial Premature Beats.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Premature Contractions -- PACs and PVCs."

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute: "Types of Arrhythmia."

University of Wisconsin Hospital: "Premature Ventricular Contractions, PVCs; Premature Atrial Contractions, PACs."

Allina Health System: "Premature Atrial Contractions."

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: "Premature Heartbeats."

Merck Manual: “Atrial Premature Beats.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 17, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What heart conditions are related to premature atrial contractions (PAC)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.