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What does it mean if you have atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

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When you put your hand on your chest, you should feel your heart's familiar lub-dub beat. If your heart races rather than beats and the feeling lasts for a few minutes, that’s a sign you might have a condition called atrial fibrillation. You might hear it called “AFib” for short.

When you have this condition, faulty electrical signals make your heart flutter or beat too fast. This abnormal rhythm stops your heart from pumping as well as it should. Your blood flow can slow enough to pool and form clots. AFib raises your chances for a stroke and other heart complications.

SOURCES:

NIH. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Atrial Fibrillation?”

American Heart Association: "What are the Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?" "What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?"

Heart Rhythm Society: "Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)."

National Health Service: "Atrial Fibrillation -- Symptoms."

StopAfib.org: "How to Know It's Atrial Fibrillation."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2018

SOURCES:

NIH. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Atrial Fibrillation?”

American Heart Association: "What are the Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?" "What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?"

Heart Rhythm Society: "Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)."

National Health Service: "Atrial Fibrillation -- Symptoms."

StopAfib.org: "How to Know It's Atrial Fibrillation."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2018

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What does atrial fibrillation (AFib) feel like?

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