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What heart issues raise the risk of atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

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Since atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a problem with your heart, it's not surprising that other heart issues raise the risk of AFib, including:

Sick sinus syndrome can also make it more likely. With this condition, the heart's electrical signals misfire, and the heart rate alternates between fast and slow. AFib can happen during a heart attack. It's the most common complication after heart surgery. It will happen to 2 or 3 out of every 10 people recovering.

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Heart valve disease
  • Rheumatic heart disease
  • Heart failure
  • Weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  • Heart birth defects
  • Inflamed membrane or sac around the heart (pericarditis)

SOURCES:

Merck Manual: "Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter."

Cleveland Clinic: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "Who is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation?" "What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?" and "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association: "When the Beat is Off: Atrial Fibrillation."

Theheart.org: "Diabetes associated with risk of atrial fibrillation."

The Lancet: "Predicting atrial fibrillation - Authors' reply."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 3, 2018

SOURCES:

Merck Manual: "Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter."

Cleveland Clinic: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "Who is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation?" "What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?" and "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association: "When the Beat is Off: Atrial Fibrillation."

Theheart.org: "Diabetes associated with risk of atrial fibrillation."

The Lancet: "Predicting atrial fibrillation - Authors' reply."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 3, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What medical conditions can increase the likelihood that you'll have atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

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