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What is paroxysmal atrial fibrillation?

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Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is when your heart goes in and out of normal rhythm for less than a week. You might feel this happening for a few minutes, or you might feel it for several days. You may not need treatment with this type of A-fib, but you should see a doctor.

This type of A-fib is nicknamed “holiday heart syndrome.” Doctors call it this when it happens to otherwise healthy people who may be celebrating with a late night out or having a few extra drinks. If the heart isn’t used to all this different activity, it may go into A-fib. It also happens sometimes when you’re under extreme stress.

People who go to the hospital for this type of A-fib are usually kept overnight. They go home the next morning if the heart’s rhythm is okay.

SOURCES: Boriani, G.   , 2016. Vascular Pharmacology

Cunningham, J. P , University of South Carolina, 2012. ursuing Improved Quality of Life In the Atrial Fibrillation Population: Evidence-Based Practice

Holding, S. August 2013 Nursing Times,

Judd, S. , 2014. Omnigraphics

McCabe, P.   , 2015. Journal of Clinical Nursing

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on June 11, 2018

SOURCES: Boriani, G.   , 2016. Vascular Pharmacology

Cunningham, J. P , University of South Carolina, 2012. ursuing Improved Quality of Life In the Atrial Fibrillation Population: Evidence-Based Practice

Holding, S. August 2013 Nursing Times,

Judd, S. , 2014. Omnigraphics

McCabe, P.   , 2015. Journal of Clinical Nursing

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on June 11, 2018

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How is persistent atrial fibrillation treated?

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