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What kinds of medications are used for atrial flutter?

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  • The classes of medications used in atrial flutter are as follows: Anti-arrhythmic medications: These drugs are used to chemically convert atrial flutter to normal sinus rhythm, reduce the frequency and duration of atrial flutter episodes, and prevent future episodes. They are often given to prevent return of atrial flutter after cardioversion. Examples are amiodarone, sotalol, ibutilide, propafenone, and flecainide.
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin): This drug decreases the conductivity of electrical impulses through the sinoatrial and atrioventricular (AV) nodes, slowing down the heart rate.
  • Beta-blockers: These drugs decrease the heart rate by slowing conduction through the AV node, plus they have a direct anti-arrhythmic effect on the atria.
  • Calcium channel blockers: These drugs also slow down the heart rate by slowing conduction through the AV node.
  • Anticoagulants: These drugs reduce the ability of the blood to clot, thus reducing the risk of an unwanted blood clot forming in the heart or in a blood vessel. Atrial flutter increases the risk of forming such blood clots.

From: Atrial Flutter WebMD Medical Reference

Author: Noel G Boyle, MB, BCh, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. Coauthor(s): Theodore A Spevack, DO, Director, Chair, Program Director, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, St Barnabas Hospital, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Kathryn L Hale, MS, PA-C, Medical Writer, eMedicine.com, Inc. Editors: Alan D Forker, MD, Program Director of Cardiovascular Fellowship, Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Medicine; Mary L Windle, Pharm D, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine.com, Inc; Anthony Anker, MD, FAAEM, Attending Physician, Emergency Department, Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, VA.  




Atrial Flutter on eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 14, 2018

Author: Noel G Boyle, MB, BCh, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. Coauthor(s): Theodore A Spevack, DO, Director, Chair, Program Director, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, St Barnabas Hospital, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Kathryn L Hale, MS, PA-C, Medical Writer, eMedicine.com, Inc. Editors: Alan D Forker, MD, Program Director of Cardiovascular Fellowship, Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Medicine; Mary L Windle, Pharm D, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine.com, Inc; Anthony Anker, MD, FAAEM, Attending Physician, Emergency Department, Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, VA.  




Atrial Flutter on eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 14, 2018

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