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What should you do if you have symptoms of atrial flutter but your electrocardiogram results are normal?

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People sometimes have symptoms suggesting atrial flutter, but their electrocardiogram result in the emergency department or medical office is normal.

This does not necessarily mean that you are imagining things. It may mean that your arrhythmia comes and goes, a very common condition. It may also mean you just have some premature beats, which is not dangerous.

If this happens to you, you may be asked to undergo an ambulatory ECG.

The purpose of an ambulatory ECG is to get documentation of whether you do or do not have a significant arrhythmia and what type.

This is important because you cannot receive treatment until your specific arrhythmia type has been identified.

From: Atrial Flutter WebMD Medical Reference

Author: Noel G Boyle, MB, BCh, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. Coauthor(s): Theodore A Spevack, DO, Director, Chair, Program Director, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, St Barnabas Hospital, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Kathryn L Hale, MS, PA-C, Medical Writer, eMedicine.com, Inc. Editors: Alan D Forker, MD, Program Director of Cardiovascular Fellowship, Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Medicine; Mary L Windle, Pharm D, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine.com, Inc; Anthony Anker, MD, FAAEM, Attending Physician, Emergency Department, Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, VA.  




Atrial Flutter on eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 14, 2018

Author: Noel G Boyle, MB, BCh, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. Coauthor(s): Theodore A Spevack, DO, Director, Chair, Program Director, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, St Barnabas Hospital, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Kathryn L Hale, MS, PA-C, Medical Writer, eMedicine.com, Inc. Editors: Alan D Forker, MD, Program Director of Cardiovascular Fellowship, Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Medicine; Mary L Windle, Pharm D, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine.com, Inc; Anthony Anker, MD, FAAEM, Attending Physician, Emergency Department, Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, VA.  




Atrial Flutter on eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 14, 2018

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How is an ambulatory electrocardiogram used in atrial flutter?

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