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When should you see a doctor for bradycardia?

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If you or a loved one notices mild to medium symptoms, go to a doctor quickly.

If you or a loved one faints, has chest pains or trouble breathing, call 911.

Tiredness, trouble concentrating, or breathing harder may just seem like part of growing older. But sometimes it’s more than that.

Be sure to tell your doctor about all your symptoms. If you wear out more easily now than you did a month or year ago, let her know.

From: What is Bradycardia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Heart Rhythm Society, “Slow Heartbeat.”

American College of Cardiology: “Bradycardia (Slow Heart Rate).”

Cleveland Clinic, “Abnormal Heart Rhythms.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bradycardia: Definition,” “Bradycardia: Symptoms,” “Bradycardia: Risk Factors,” “Bradycardia: Causes.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine, “Bradycardia.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 01, 2018

SOURCES:

Heart Rhythm Society, “Slow Heartbeat.”

American College of Cardiology: “Bradycardia (Slow Heart Rate).”

Cleveland Clinic, “Abnormal Heart Rhythms.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bradycardia: Definition,” “Bradycardia: Symptoms,” “Bradycardia: Risk Factors,” “Bradycardia: Causes.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine, “Bradycardia.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 01, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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