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Who can get atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

ANSWER

Anyone can have atrial fibrillation (AFib), but it's more common in people aged 60 years and older. Other heart problems can make it more likely. These include:

People with certain medical conditions have a greater chance, too:

  • Heart disease due to high blood pressure
  • Heart valve disease
  • Heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy)
  • Heart defect from birth (congenital heart defect)
  • Heart failure
  • Past heart surgery
  • Long-term lung disease (such as COPD)
  • Overactive thyroid gland
  • Sleep apnea

SOURCES:

News release, FDA.

American Heart Association: "Atrial Fibrillation."

Cleveland Clinic: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Atrial Fibrillation."

The University of Chicago Medical Center: "Surgical Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation."

Shea, J. , May 20, 2008. Circulation

Ferri, F. , 1st ed., Mosby Elsevier, 2010. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2011

Bonow, R. , 9th ed. Saunders Elsevier, 2011. Braunwald's Heart Disease - A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine

Task Force for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. , October 2010. European Heart Journal

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 3, 2018

SOURCES:

News release, FDA.

American Heart Association: "Atrial Fibrillation."

Cleveland Clinic: "What is Atrial Fibrillation?"

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Atrial Fibrillation."

The University of Chicago Medical Center: "Surgical Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation."

Shea, J. , May 20, 2008. Circulation

Ferri, F. , 1st ed., Mosby Elsevier, 2010. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2011

Bonow, R. , 9th ed. Saunders Elsevier, 2011. Braunwald's Heart Disease - A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine

Task Force for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. , October 2010. European Heart Journal

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 3, 2018

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What is atrial fibrillation (AFib) linked to?

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