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How can you treat diastolic heart failure with medication?

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Medication: You may need to take one or more drugs as part of your treatment. Common heart failure medications for diastolic heart failure include:

  • Diuretics, which help ease swelling
  • Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, a type of diuretic to get rid of extra salt and fluid but help the body keep potassium
  • High blood pressure medication

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Heart Failure?" "Types of Heart Failure," "Warning Signs of Heart Failure."

UpToDate: "Patient education: Heart failure (Beyond the Basics)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Types."

HeartHealthyWomen.org: "Diastolic Heart Failure."

National Jewish Health: "Diastolic Dysfunction."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure."

Cedars-Sinai: "Heart Failure."

Baptist Health: "Diastolic Heart Failure."

American Heart Association: "Common Tests for Heart Failure."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Heart Failure."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What is Heart Failure?"

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 6, 2019

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Heart Failure?" "Types of Heart Failure," "Warning Signs of Heart Failure."

UpToDate: "Patient education: Heart failure (Beyond the Basics)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Types."

HeartHealthyWomen.org: "Diastolic Heart Failure."

National Jewish Health: "Diastolic Dysfunction."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure."

Cedars-Sinai: "Heart Failure."

Baptist Health: "Diastolic Heart Failure."

American Heart Association: "Common Tests for Heart Failure."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Heart Failure."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What is Heart Failure?"

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 6, 2019

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When would I need oxygen therapy for heart failure?

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