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How does the heart react to heart failure?

ANSWER

It will try to make up for underperforming:

One problem with this is that, over time, an enlarged heart leads to fluid building up in your body, including the lungs. Because blood isn't moving well out of the heart, it backs up coming in. Veins swell, and tissues can't send back the blood without oxygen.

  • The chambers expand to allow more blood to move with each heartbeat.
  • It contracts, or squeezes, more strongly.
  • The muscle thickens so it can pump with more force.
  • It beats faster.

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Heart Failure?" "Types of Heart Failure," "How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Heart Failure."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Stages."

American Family Physician: "Essentials of the Diagnosis of Heart Failure."

Mayo Clinic: "Tachycardia: Symptoms and causes," "Cardiomyopathy: Causes."

UCSF Medical Center: "Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms."

BMJ : "ABC of heart failure: Acute and chronic management strategies."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2019

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "What is Heart Failure?" "Types of Heart Failure," "How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Heart Failure."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Stages."

American Family Physician: "Essentials of the Diagnosis of Heart Failure."

Mayo Clinic: "Tachycardia: Symptoms and causes," "Cardiomyopathy: Causes."

UCSF Medical Center: "Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms."

BMJ : "ABC of heart failure: Acute and chronic management strategies."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 2, 2019

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What is tachycardia?

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