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How is high-output heart failure treated?

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Many of the causes of high-output heart failure are curable. It's a good idea to treat the underlying cause first.

Your doctor may suggest other treatments, including a diet low in salt and water. You may also take diuretics (water pills) to help ease swelling.

Taking traditional heart failure drugs will often not help. They can make things worse. There are medicines called vasoconstrictor adrenergics that can help by making your blood vessels smaller.

SOURCES:

Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine : "High Output Cardiac Failure."

Journal of the American College of Cardiology : "High-Output Heart Failure."

QJM : "High output heart failure."

American Heart Association: "Warning Signs of Heart Failure."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Symptoms."

Cedars-Sinai: "Heart Failure."

American Family Physician: "Essentials of the Diagnosis of Heart Failure."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 6, 2019

SOURCES:

Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine : "High Output Cardiac Failure."

Journal of the American College of Cardiology : "High-Output Heart Failure."

QJM : "High output heart failure."

American Heart Association: "Warning Signs of Heart Failure."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Heart Failure: Symptoms."

Cedars-Sinai: "Heart Failure."

American Family Physician: "Essentials of the Diagnosis of Heart Failure."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 6, 2019

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What is compensated heart failure?

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