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What are some energy conserving tips for those with heart failure?

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Energy-conserving tips for those with heart failure:

  • Simplify your tasks and set realistic goals. Don't think you have to do things the same way you've always done them.
  • Plan your activities ahead of time. Do not schedule too many activities to do in one day. Do the things that take more energy when you are feeling your best. If needed, rest before and after activities. If you become tired during an activity, stop and rest. You may need to finish it on another day or when you feel less tired. Also, do not plan activities right after a meal.
  • Get a good night's sleep. Be careful not to nap too much during the day or you might not be able to sleep at night.
  • Ask for help. Divide the tasks among family and friends.
  • If needed, use devices and tools that assist you, such as a walker, shower chair, hand-held shower head, bedside toilet, or long-handled tools for dressing (such as a shoe horn).
  • Wear clothes that have zippers and buttons in the front so you don't have to reach behind you.
  • Do all of your grooming (shaving, drying your hair, etc.) while sitting.
  • If your doctor says it's okay, you may climb steps. You may need to rest part of the way if you become tired. Try to arrange your activities so you do not have to climb up and down stairs many times during the day.
  • Avoid extreme physical activity. Do not push, pull, or lift heavy objects (more than 10 pounds).
  • For more energy-saving tips, tell your doctor you would like to speak to an occupational therapist or cardiac rehabilitation specialist. Sometimes, cardiac rehabilitation can help increase your energy levels and help you get your strength back.

From: Living With Heart Failure WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Heart Failure" and "How can I Live With Heart Failure?"

Heart Failure Society of America: "Learn More About Heart Failure."

 

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 23, 2017

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Heart Failure" and "How can I Live With Heart Failure?"

Heart Failure Society of America: "Learn More About Heart Failure."

 

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 23, 2017

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