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What happens when you have end-stage heart failure?

ANSWER

Your heart pumps blood around your body to supply all of your organs with oxygen. When it doesn’t work the way it should anymore, you have what’s known as heart failure. Your ticker may not be strong enough to gather enough oxygen from your lungs, or to pump oxygen-rich blood around your body.

Either way, heart failure causes health problems and must be treated by a doctor. Drugs and lifestyle changes may help you lead a more active life than you’d be able to without treatment.

Over time, if your health gets worse, you may learn that you have advanced heart failure, also known as end-stage heart failure. It means the treatments you’ve used in the past to keep your health stable no longer work.

From: Signs of End-Stage Heart Failure WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Warning Signs of Heart Failure,” “What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?” “What Is Heart Failure?”

American Heart Association: “Advanced Heart Failure.”

Heart Failure Society of America: “Common Symptoms of Heart Failure.”

Emory Healthcare: “Emory Advanced Heart Failure Therapy Center helps you understand heart failure.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Nocturia.”

Circulation : “A Patient’s Guide to Living Confidently With Chronic Heart Failure.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on September 5, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Warning Signs of Heart Failure,” “What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?” “What Is Heart Failure?”

American Heart Association: “Advanced Heart Failure.”

Heart Failure Society of America: “Common Symptoms of Heart Failure.”

Emory Healthcare: “Emory Advanced Heart Failure Therapy Center helps you understand heart failure.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Nocturia.”

Circulation : “A Patient’s Guide to Living Confidently With Chronic Heart Failure.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on September 5, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.